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Facebook Like, The Big Fake

by @ 6:25 pm
Filed under: google,web — Tags: ,

facebook fake likeEarlier this year this insightful article delved into the business of click farming where people and businesses (and apparently even the US government) pay shady companies a modest fee for thousands of Facebook likes, or Twitter followers, or YouTube views. Only that these likes and clicks are generated by click farms, either malware robots and zombies, or zombie-like people clicking mindlessly, essentially producing inflated popularity through fraud.

I am not much a social media expert or even user, yet I knew about click farming. I just didn't know how extensive the practice was until recently.

At this point we must assume that the vast majority of likes, views and followers are fake. Certainly not everyone is involved, but faced with such overwhelming and obvious scam, one must conclude that digital popularity is now but fiction and holds no credibility. And it doesn't matter who they are, even governments, legitimate companies and celebrities can not be ruled out.

Online scamming is not new. When link farming became a popular method to attain high ranking in Google results pages, Google fought back by changing the rules because SEO scamming was becoming an existential threat to its business. Once users' trust is lost, it is difficult, if not impossible, to gain it back.

Popular social sites such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube are now faced with the same credibility issue and they are fully aware of the problem and have the means to correct it. But it's business as usual because most users haven't woken up to the reality of click farming, yet.

Just like now when everybody immediately dismisses an email purportedly sent by a Nigerian prince, an increasing number of users are glossing over the stats on social sites. When the majority of these stats are fake, the whole system becomes useless and irrelevant.

What's Facebook Worth?

by @ 9:51 pm
Filed under: financial,web — Tags: ,

I can't possibly the only one who's had a perverse pleasure in seeing Facebook's stock slide after the much ballyhooed IPO. It's not like I wish the company bad fortune or dislike its boss, although I don't think much of Facebook as a product nor do I use it much. It's just that something so hyped and overblown seems so out of touch with reality that one doesn't want to see it take off like it's 1999, specially if one is not along for the ride.

Given the nearly daily declines of Facebook's stock, one does however wonder where the bottom of this stock really is. At the current level of $29, it probably doesn't have much further to go, give or take a couple of dollars. At the same time something tells me that the big investors are just waiting to pounce on the stock once they believe it has sufficiently deflated.

Us mortals will know where that bottom is long after it has passed, but if one can time a purchase somewhere near that bottom, chances are that it will pay off handsomely. There's probably a lot of money on the sidelines waiting to get in and when that happens the stock would snap back with a vengeance.

Forget valuations and future earnings. This one seems to be going on pure psychology right now. Hell, even I'm thinking about getting in 🙂

Facebook IPO Price Clamp

by @ 12:53 pm
Filed under: financial — Tags: , ,

Seems like everything was on hold yesterday except for the Facebook stock price gyrations. In the end it eked out a measly 23 cents over its IPO price of $38 and that with some grand assistance from its underwriters and backers.

That assistance was so obvious, specially towards the end of the trading session. You could tell the stock really wanted to break below $38, but every time it touched that price it was nudged back up. Looked totally artificial and trigger-directed. Obviously the bankers didn't want to look foolish by having the stock close below IPO's price. That would have meant that they didn't do their homework. At least this way they can claim they priced it in the Goldilocks zone, not too hot, not too cold, but just right.

Well, the founder and a bunch of other people that matter became uber-wealthy yesterday and there's still a chance that the stock may get its footing and actually climb. Sure, it's an expensive stock with the P/E ratio currently at 122, but Amazon's P/E is an astounding 175. Going by Amazon's measure, Facebook should at least be worth $55 per share.

Facebook Privacy?

by @ 10:53 am
Filed under: internet,law,social — Tags: ,

Who needs spies and detectives when people willingly put all their personal data for the whole world to see? Funny how parts of the world pine for a little relief from the prying eyes of their governments, yet in the US people are addicted to sharing everything with everyone, including the government.

The young can be excused for being too inexperienced to realize the consequences of over-sharing. But then there are simpletons who claim they don't fear sharing because they do nothing wrong. Bet they are the first ones screaming bloody violation of their rights the moment that data is used against them.

Cops can request a copy of your complete Facebook activity - Technolog on msnbc.com.

New Ugly Gmail Look

by @ 9:23 am
Filed under: email,google — Tags: ,

Yesterday I was greeted by an icon in Gmail to try their new look. I clicked, played with the new look for a while and ran right back to the old look. Alas, Google seems determined to push the new Gmail look on users, whether they like it or not, so the classic look may not last much longer.

I had two immediate negative reactions to the new design. The style is plain ugly and it also stinks of social networking. There are no clear cut delineations between the email area, the navigation, the ads, and the buttons. Elements seem to have been randomly placed on the page with very little contrast to differentiate the various areas.

Google will probably deny this but the new design is like Google+ crammed into Gmail. Everything has profile pictures in it and email threads look like wall posting timelines now. You can try the compact mode to squeeze everything together but that doesn’t help much. The elements never quite collapse like the classic version.

When will companies learn? You can't force people to like a product. This is the case of Gmail trying to push Google+ on the users and it doesn't work. The Gmail help forums are already rife with critical messages from disgruntled users. If Gmail wants to give its users new look and feel options, that's fine, but not allowing users to have the classic look is just heavy-handed.

Users can revolt and threaten to leave Gmail and hope Google pulls a BoA in the end. But if Google decides to push forward with the new look, it may be time to ditch Gmail for other services. This may be a golden opportunity for Facebook to beef up its pitiful email platform and steal users away.

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